Drunken Sailors

Stories From The Road – Riding the Indi-Pac

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Interested in a fun packed afternoon of listening to local Legends Jaimes Raison and Sam “Go the Mo” Jeffries talk? Next Sunday, May 28, between 2 and 4pm, you can listen to James and Sam bounce off each other as they try to outdo each other on their epic tales of courage, living off roadkill (roadhouse food) and shouting sweet nothings to each other in the dead of night as they made their way across the Nullabor Plain in the Indian Pacific Wheel Race.

Its not just limited to the 2 clowns, with SA riders Claire, Davin #900pumps, Hugh and Chris have kindly agreed to speak about riding Indi-Pac 2017

Head on down to the Adelaide Bike Kitchen, 22 Gibson St, Bowden (enter off Third Av.), Bowden 5007. Next Week, Sunday, May 28 at 2 PM – 4 PM

  • 2.00pm Meet and mingle with Adelaide’s cycling community.
  • 3.00pm The riders speak and answer questions about the Indi-Pac experience. The preparation, the highs and the lows and maybe show us some of their photos or video from the road. How to honour the loss of Mike? Would they go again?

It’s also a good chance to see and learn more about the Adelaide Bike Kitchen community who are kindly hosting us.

BYO chairs, snacks and drinks. Entry: Gold Coin Donation to support the Kitchen.

Watch the facebook page here:  https://www.facebook.com/events/309284002826064/

Crashes

There’s been a couple of talking points over the last few days around crashes, particularly the events directly after the crash.

The first you probably heard about the crash on Stage 9 of the Giro.

Wilco Kelderman (Team Sunweb) found himself unable to avoid a police motorbike parked up on the left-hand side of the road on the approach to the concluding 13.6km ascent of Blockhaus.  He veered right, clipped the motorbike, causing a domino effect in the bunch that took out virtually the entire Sky team, including their co-leader, Mikel Landa.  Orica Scott’s Adam Yates was also caught up in the crash.

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Team Sky’s Landa got up quickly but a leg injury meant he lost 26 minutes.  Geraint Thomas chased despite his shoulder coming out of its socket and suffering multiple cuts. He lost 5:08 and declared his overall chances as ‘Game Over’. Adam Yates slumped to 17th overall at 4:49 down on Nairo Quintana. Kelderman was forced to quit the Giro d’Italia after fracturing his finger.

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The other one which I saw yesterday afternoon is quite frightening to watch the 30 seconds or so after the crash.

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Cannondale-Drapac’s Toms Skujins crashed towards the finish of the Amgen Tour of California.  He was later diagnosed with a concussion, left collarbone fracture and road rash.

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After staggering back to his bike and having the front wheel replaced by the neutral service mechanic, he mounted the bike, but immediately lost balance and crashed flat on his face, losing his glasses.  Staggering around the road whilst riders were screaming past, like a drunk sailor on a rolling deck, the passing riders had to make a choice which side to go. fortunately no one else got caught, but it could have been disastrous. I know they have no authority, however sometimes a call has to be made, and I think that was one of those times when the neutral service mechanic should have held him up till the race doctor got there.

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He was later pulled from the race under the direction of his team.

Fortunately no major damage.  “I’m feeling all right,” Skujins said. “I’m really bummed, of course. Besides that, I’m healthy. I’m good. We’ll assess with the team doctors and figure things out moving forward.

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Warm Front

I had a warm front pass through the labs a few weeks ago, a full beam warm front thermal base layer that is.

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It’s a strange looking thing, looking like a ribbed tea towel with a collar, lightweight (51g), and certainly got it’s fair share of ribbing at the Sunday morning coffee discussion as it doesn’t look like anything any of us have ever ridden with before.

A few weekends back, i decided to get in a long days ride, starting on the road at 4:30am, doing laps up to Mt Lofty till about 3 in the afternoon.  A lovely day, but to start with it was  friggin cold.  For some reason i left the arm warmers, base layer and long finger gloves at home, riding with the warm front, jersey and gilet. The war front was tucked on the back pocket on the way up, and pulled out for the trip back down. Having been in the back on the way up, it was in fact toasty warm from the body heat on the trip down.  It worked a treat.   It saved this little ducks bacon, and after 3 laps and the sun coming off, it was left of fr the remainder of the ride rolled up in the back pocket, light as a 51g feather.

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Its not for everyone, but certainly worthy of consideration at on those early morning rides where you know it will be cold coming back down those long descents.

Further details here  https://fullbeam.com.au/collections/the-warmfront-base-layer/products/warmfront-thermal-base-layer-for-men

Oh, the fashion police in my group understood its purpose, and made the one suggestion – I should have got the one with the white collar!

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Rider of the Week – Bria Smith

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I’ve seen Bria’s face pop up on a number of cyclists social media pages, the one that stood out was when she took a bike selfie with Benny JJ doing one of his nsane 12 in 12 Everests last year.  Poor Benny JJ was curled over his handle bars grind upwards once more, Bria was upright, smiling and looking fresh as a daisy – brilliant.

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Enjoy this weeks Rider of the Week. Oh, and be warned, there are some bloodied photos, so if you are squeamish, rule #5………………………………..

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I am a 27 year old Paramedic with the SA Ambulance Service. I got my first road bike around 2007 and started dabbling with group rides around 2008. I’m a super active, outdoorsy sort of person. When I’m not working or riding my road bike I also spend a fair hunk of time skydiving and sometimes riding my mountain bike, rock climbing at the gym or doing other activities.
I’m currently putting in a bit of training for my first ever triathlon, a half Ironman in Kangaroo Island in November with a view to do a full IM next year. I love travel and exploring and do that whenever I can. I am currently saving for my first home, and really need to stop spending money on bikes and fun things so I can afford a deposit 😛
  • Can you remember what your first bike was?
I had a few hand me down bikes from my big brothers at a young age and eventually got my own mountain bike for my 14th birthday I think it was! It might have been a giant yukon if my memory serves me correct (or maybe that was the second one and I had some repco thing first!)
I know my first road bike was an Avanti carbonario with a 105 group set. I got rid of that one crashing it at 60km/hr down from lofty!
  • What got you started in cycling?
As kids we were an active family and often went on rides all together when we were at the beach house. I always laugh that I can remember dad promising me an ice cream at Victor Harbour if I rode from Goolwa with him, now days I promise him a coffee at Glenelg if he makes it!! how the tables have turned!
I got my first road bike when I started uni to ride into the city on and to supplement my fitness training for hockey as running so much was giving me brutal shin splints! A couple of other friends got bikes at a similar time and we started doing what we thought were big rides from the city to Henley!! These mates soon after joined the Lakers triathlon club and I started riding with their group rides which really changed riding for me and was probably the true start of me being a cyclist

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  • At a guess, how many bikes have you owned in your life?
Ohh a few kids bikes, 3 proper dual suspension mountain bikes and I’m onto roadie number 4.
  • What is your main go to bike?
Currently I only have the two, and it depends on if I am heading to the trails or the road!
One mountain – a top spec Lapierre Zesty AM
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And the roadie, an ENVEed up cannonade hi mod super six Evo with e-tap! (refer to cannot afford house due to liking nice toys comment haha).
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I am hoping to see if Cracked Carbon and Bicycle Express might be able to mend my much beloved Lapierre Xelius 800 and throw some cheaper wheels and groupset etc on to rebirth him as a commuter (I feel a bit dirty downspecing my special bike but I figure its better than retiring him completely, on that note anyone selling decent alloy wheels cheap? hahaha!).
  • What bike do you covet?
 Ohh, I don’t really have any particular thing I have drooled over since forever, I really like smooth, sleek looking bikes in general. I guess if I had to pick one it would probably be a Pinarello Dogma F8 (or F10 now), yeah, I would like one of them, I wouldn’t be caught riding Campag on it tho!
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  • What do you personally get out of cycling?
A clear head, a smile on my face, and an excuse to eat a donut!
Mountain biking really is a bit of fun, kinda fills the no snowboarding in Adelaide hole in my life, lets me get some flow, adrenaline and hi fives into my life, it also gets me out into nature, on the dirt, away from the city, which I love about it!
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Road riding is super satisfying, I love how I feel after a solid ride through the hills, its a good kind of salty! Sometimes work or even just life can be a bit stressful or get me down and I find heading on a ride really makes everything seem a bit less heavy on my shoulders and gives me a clearer view of how to deal with what might be on my mind.
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I have also met some of my favourite people in my life through road cycling, so that’s pretty tops too 🙂
Obviously its pretty good for my general health and fitness too, being fit and healthy is important to me! I definitely feel better for riding, some years back I injured my knee snowboarding and had to have a few months off, it wasn’t until this point i realised exactly how important riding was for my general mental health and mood! (long story short, no riding for Bria = grumpy bria).


  • Do you do all your own maintenance or do you use a LBS? If so, which one?

Haha hell no!

I used to bake cupcakes to get my LBS to do minor maintenance for me! I’m a classic for just riding in and going “its making a strange noise” or “something feels wrong” at the end of a ride, lucky they seem to tolerate me doing this! The best I do is a hose off, towel down and bit of lube on the chain! (and I might start checking my pivot bolt torques on the mtb after it fell out and I nearly crashed the other week!)
Bicycle Express on Halifax street do a pretty good job of looking after me and my bikes (I always get more than one hug per visit), I have been a loyal customer to them and they do their best to keep me happy (sorry Ben about all the times I text you out of hours – you probably should have never given me your phone number :P) 

  • What is your favourite piece of cycling kit or accessory?

I can tell you what my least favourite is, the bib knicks we had for the Beat Cancer Tour, being made to ride in mens knicks for the whole TDU had me super appreciating all of my nice usual kits! (#flapchat will forever be a thing now).

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My current favourite kit is probably my velocio, my favourite gadget is probably my Garmin (even if it made me ride 10 more laps than Rob Greenwood for the same elevation in our everest  – actually I hate my garmin, its evil, why would it do that!) and I am loving the SRAM e-tap on my new bike. 

  • If you could have dinner with 3 people from the cycling world (living or dead), who would they be and why?

I really have no idea on this one, I don’t really have any cycling idols as such! I always enjoy when I’ve been lucky enough to hang with Annette Edmondson or Patrick Jonker, they are top humans.

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I’ve a pretty funny story about meeting Lance Armstrong and George Hincapie when I was out drinking with friends as an 18 yr old too! I found George a super genuine and friendly guy, I’d happily have dinner with him again too.

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  • Where would you take them to eat?

I’d get Nick Filsell cook them some ace pizza at his Lost In a Forest restaurant in Uraidla

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  • What are your craziest/fondest cycling memories?
Melbourne to Adelaide ride in 2010 for Butts on Bikes for bubs, well I think it was 2010, around about then! That was a crazy motley crew of such different riding abilities but somehow we made it all the way and raised enough to buy the Flinders Medical Centre a fancy new crib for their neonatal unit (which very cooly ended up housing the baby of one of our crew down the track!)
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Riding with the Beat Cancer Tour riders every stage, every day as their Medic last year. The opportunity to be a part of the tour and ride with some of the most inspiring people I have ever met is certainly something I will not forget. It was a huge week and really took it out of me as I was a late inclusion when their original medic fell through so my preparation was very sub par, but got through (admittedly with a small push from organiser Bade on the last lap of Willunga Hill which he will NEVER let me forget 😛 ) and loved the experience so much.
Completing an everest attempt I never intended to do (thanks to everyone that peer pressured me into that one……I think….and a special mention to Benny JJ for setting me up for success with it and to Anna Puckridge and Stuart Brand keeping me going on the day – lots of people helped me but these guys really went above and beyond)
But I think the pick is definitely getting my sub 10 hour 3 peaks Falls Creek last year.
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I had put in a lot of early mornings, huge kms, verts, and never ever visited Mt Lofty summit so frequently as the months leading up to that event with my super best bike buddy Rob Greenwood. I totally owe him for this achievement, he kept me motivated through training, believed in me when I thought it wasn’t possible, gave me a plan for the day and was waiting for me on the finish line after completing the event himself. I don’t think I have ever felt as elated as when I crossed that line at 9 hours and 53 minutes and Rob wrapped me up into the biggest/saltiest hug I’ve ever had (then force fed me about 5 cups of Hydralyte).
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I had plenty of battles on that ride, and to get across the line in the time I thought was a pipe dream was the best.
(WL Note – the time board at the finish line shows the elapsed time from the time the first rider crossed the line, not the individual rider times, therefore Bria’s ride time is less than the board time).
  • Have you had any nasty crashes? If so how did the worst occur and what was the consequence?
Haha oh I’ve had plenty, none TOO bad luckily.
Roadie wise I dropped that original Avanti down the old freeway from Lofty at 60km/hr (yep, that awkward camber left hand sweeping corner not long being devils elbow), I had some epic gravel rash down my left butt cheek and leg and felt pretty sore and sorry for myself but was super lucky to not break anything but the bike!
Daily visits to the doctor to further debride gravel and lycra fragments out the wound for a week but apparently I heal super fast and they were surprised I got away with no skin grafts (winning!). For the record you also get a lot of attention edging a rather broken bike down a hill with a bleeding arse hanging out the back!
I was also knocked off by a car riding into uni but lucky only did some minor shoulder and leg damage, the lesson learnt from this one is adrenaline lets you think you are not hurt and its not until you continue your ride into uni that you realise your front wheel is buckled and your body hurts and you probably should have got that cars details!
Mountain biking the crashes are endless, sometimes I go a bit hard haha. I’ve been through a few helmets and mild concussions, plenty of abrasions, last year managed to get 5 stitches in my ear in one crash and 7 in my chin and 3 in my arm from another. (I cracked the shits after that one and stopped riding mtb for a bit but am finding my flow again now!
LOOK AWAY NOW!
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  • What is the biggest cycling lie you have told a partner?
I am currently single, so I don’t have to lie to anyone ;P


  • What cycling related thing would you like for your next birthday?
Weren’t we talking about that Dogma earlier? 😉 haha honestly I’d be stoked with some new bottles that actually fit in my smancy Enve bottle cages (matchy of course). My cannonade ones wobble around and my camelback ones get stuck, it makes me a bit irrationally annoyed when I’m tired on a ride!
One of Flic and Lobos RAD hats would be ace too.
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Or if we are talking mountain bikes I’m super eyeing off a lightweight full face enduro helmet, something like a MET parachute (I have chin fear after last year).


  • Is there a local cycling outfit/company/cycling club/cycling group/person that you would like to plug?
Oh I guess I’ll give a shout out to the guys and girls who look after me at Bicycle Express. I’ll also say HI to Nat from Spin Cycle coz he’s a champ, and everyone should get on board with Flic and Lobos next round of caps when they release them (which I believe is soon!).  (WL note – too late, they’re sold out already).
Also cheers to the Lakers Triathlon Club, the Redline Cycling club and the Hells 500 Adelaide crew who provide me with all my decent group rides.
Lastly to Rob Greenwood and Anna Puckridge  for being my best bike buddies ever and supporting me in any silly bike related idea I might ever have.


  • From a non-cycling perspective, what do you love about Adelaide?
Its an awesome place to live! I love how accessible everything is, in really not much time you can be down the beach, in the nature parks feeling like you’re miles from anywhere, in wine region, really almost anywhere you want to be! We have lots of super cool places to eat and drink and the best coffee, so many spots to get top coffee (which for a bike riding, shift worker is a HUGE plus).


  • What is your non-cycling go-to place when interstaters come to Adelaide?
My family has a beach house at Goolwa and I love taking people down there, or sometimes taking them to Langhorne Creek and sharing my other little amazing world I have there, as you’ll see in the next answer!


  • You participate in another outdoor activity that has you hurtling at a speed around 190kmph. What is this insane activity and what do you get out of it?

Haha! I recently completed my 400th solo skydive a few weeks back. Honestly it is the best thing ever. People always ask me why do you skydive? Its sort of one of those things you can’t explain to people who haven’t done it, to put it simply, it makes me happy, while I am there almost nothing else in the world matters. Sure it doesn’t solve any problems but somehow the time I spend there adds such quality to my life that I feel like my problems are never such a big deal after a couple of days with the amazing crew there.

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Its a real sky family, and skydiving is just pure bliss. You can really make it what you want, depending on what kind of jump I do it can either be adrenaline pumping, hi five inducing insane fun or really peaceful experience. I’m really just starting to learn more about performance flying my canopy too and am really enjoying that dimension of the sport as well now.
I think you should probably come with me for a jump and then you might be able to answer the question better for me! On that note if anyone from the Adelaide Cycling family wants to come for a skydive, flick me a message on Facebook and I’ll be able to organise mates rates for you at SA Skydiving!

 

Thanks Bria, a great read. I had to google a few of the terms you mentioned – #FLAPCHAT and Debride (To remove dead, contaminated, or adherent tissue and/or foreign material. To debride a wound is to remove all materials that may promote infection and impede healing. This may be done by enzymes (as with proteolytic enzymes), mechanical methods (as in a whirlpool), or sharp debridement (using intruments).

The first had me in stitches, and the second had me cringing.  Looking back to a face plant i had last year, whilst the staff at Wakefied didn’t call it debriding, they decided it would be best for me if they gave me some twilight anesthesia so i wouldn’t remember what they did to me.

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Amgen Tour of  California

Stage 1

AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 1 Men's: Sacramento121313__HAR5189AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 1 Men's: Sacramento154204_ATOC2017S1Podium-9918

Stage 2

AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San JoseAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San JoseAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San Jose

AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San Jose

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Giro

After 9 stages, a few crashes, controversy on the blockhaus (slow news week I assume), Nairo Quintana stamped his authority over the race with a dominant win on Stage 9 Blockhaus to take the maglia rosa.

However after Stage 10 TT,  Nairo lost a wopping 2:53 to Time Trial winner Tom Duomolin, whom he now trails as they head on over to the mountains. Tom is targeting the GC this year, but realises Nairo is the superior rider, but its a long 3rd week coming up, so anything is possible.

1 Tom Dumoulin (Ned) Team Sunweb 42:57:16
2 Nairo Quintana (Col) Movistar Team 0:02:23
3 Bauke Mollema (Ned) Trek-Segafredo 0:02:38
4 Thibaut Pinot (Fra) FDJ 0:02:40
5 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:02:47

Stage 1 – Alghero → Olbia

104804_649804735120330_649791252122620_649766548Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 1 - da Alghero a Olbia -  206 km ( 128 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 1 - da Alghero a Olbia -  206 km ( 128 miglia )

Stage 2: Olbia → Tortolì

110101_650034008111638_650012781112101_649974755Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 2 - da Olbia a Tortoli' -  211 km ( 131 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 2 - da Olbia a Tortoli' -  211 km ( 131 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 2 -  Olbia -Tortoli' -  211 km ( 131 miglia )06-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 02 Olbia - Tortoli; 2017, Lotto - Soudal; Greipel, Andre; Tortoli;

Stage 3: Tortolì → Cagliari

114446_650207637Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione - Tortoli'-CagliariGiro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 2 - da Olbia a Tortoli' -  211 km ( 131 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 3 - da Tortoli' a Cagliari -  148 km ( 91,9 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 3 - da Tortoli' a Cagliari -  148 km ( 91,9 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 3 - da Tortoli' a Cagliari -  148 km ( 91,9 miglia )

Cefalù → Etna-Rifugio

09-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 04 Cefalu - Etna; Cefalu;114329_650615010Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 4 - da Cefalu' a Etna -  181 km ( 112 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 4 - da Cefalu' a Etna -  181 km ( 112 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 4 - da Cefalu' a Etna -  181 km ( 112 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 4 - da Cefalu' a Etna -  181 km ( 112 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 4 - da Cefalu' a Etna -  181 km ( 112 miglia )09-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 04 Cefalu - Etna; 2017, Uae - Fly Emirates; Polanc, Jan; Etna;Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 4 - da Cefalu' a Etna -  181 km ( 112 miglia )

Stage 6: Reggio Calabria → Terme Luigiane

11-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 06 Reggio Calabria - Terme Luigiane; 2017, Quick - Step Floors; Jungels, Bob; Gaviria Rendon, Fernando; Reggio Calabria;Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 6 - da Reggio Calabria a Terme Luigiane - 217 km ( 134,8 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 6 - da Reggio Calabria a Terme Luigiane - 217 km ( 134,8 miglia )164318_651670691164402_651748136

Stage 7: Castrovillari → Alberobello

111045_651919085Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 7 - da Castrovillari a Alberobello (Valle d'Itria) - 224 km ( 139 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 7 - da Castrovillari a Alberobello (Valle d'Itria) - 224 km ( 139 miglia )12-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 07 Castrovillari - Alberobello; 2017, Orica - Scott; 2017, Bora - Hansgrohe; 2017, Quick - Step Floors; Ewan, Caleb; Bennett, Sam; Gaviria Rendon, Fernando; Alberobello;173636b-photo-finish12-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 07 Castrovillari - Alberobello; 2017, Orica - Scott; Ewan, Caleb; Alberobello;Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 7 - da Castrovillari a Alberobello (Valle d'Itria) - 224 km ( 139 miglia )

Stage 8: Molfetta → Peschic

Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 6 - da Reggio Calabria a Terme Luigiane - 217 km ( 134Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione - Molfetta-PeschiciGiro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 8 - da Molfetta a Peschici- 189 km ( 117 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 8 - da Molfetta a Peschici- 189 km ( 117 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 8 - da Molfetta a Peschici- 189 km ( 117 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 8 - da Molfetta a Peschici- 189 km ( 117 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 8 - da Molfetta a Peschici- 189 km ( 117 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 8 - da Molfetta a Peschici- 189 km ( 117 miglia )

Stage 9: Montenero di Bisaccia → Blockhaus

Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione - Montenero di Bisaccia-BlockhausGiro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione - Montenero di Bisaccia-BlockhausGiro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione - Montenero di Bisaccia-Blockhaus14-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 09 Montenero Di Bisaccia - Blockhaus; Blockhaus;Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 9 - da Montenero di Bisaccia a Blockhaus - 152 km ( 94,4 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 9 - da Montenero di Bisaccia a Blockhaus - 152 km ( 94,4 miglia )163802_140517 POOL Giro Stage 9 (c)Tim De Waele112Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 9 - da Montenero di Bisaccia a Blockhaus - 152 km ( 94,4 miglia )14-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 09 Montenero Di Bisaccia - Blockhaus; 2017, Movistar; Quintana Rojas Nairo, Alexander; Blockhaus;Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 9 - da Montenero di Bisaccia a Blockhaus - 152 km ( 94,4 miglia )165720_652539094Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 9 - da Montenero di Bisaccia a Blockhaus - 152 km ( 94,4 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 9 - da Montenero di Bisaccia a Blockhaus - 152 km ( 94,4 miglia )14-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 09 Montenero Di Bisaccia - Blockhaus; 2017, Movistar; Quintana Rojas Nairo, Alexander; Blockhaus;

 

Stage 10: Foligno → Montefalco

Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 10 - da Foligno a Montefalco - ITT - 3915-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 10 Foligno - Montefalco; 2017, Team Sunweb; Dumoulin, Tom; Montefalco;15-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 10 Foligno - Montefalco; 2017, Team Sky; Geraint, Thomas;15-05-2017 Giro D'italia; Tappa 10 Foligno - Montefalco; 2017, Quick - Step Floors; Jungels, Bob;Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 10 - da Foligno a Montefalco - ITT - 39,8 km ( 24,7 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 10 - da Foligno a Montefalco - ITT - 39,8 km ( 24,7 miglia )Giro d'Italia 2017 - 100a edizione -  Tappa 10 - da Foligno a Montefalco - ITT - 39,8 km ( 24,7 miglia )

Amgen Tour of Cal;ifornia

Stage 1: Sacramento → Sacramento

AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 1 Men's: Sacramento121313__HAR5189AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 1 Men's: Sacramento154204_ATOC2017S1Podium-9918

Stage 2: Pismo Beach → Morro Bay

AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San JoseAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San JoseAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San JoseAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 2 Men's: Modesto to San Jose

Stage 3: Pismo Beach → Morro Bay

AMGEN Tour of California - Stage 3 Men's: Pismo Beach to Morro BayAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 3 Men's: Pismo Beach to Morro BayAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 3 Men's: Pismo Beach to Morro BayAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 3 Men's: Pismo Beach to Morro BayAMGEN Tour of California - Stage 3 Men's: Pismo Beach to Morro Bay

 

hoping you enjoyed this weeks posting

till next time

tight spokes

iPib

No Sleep Till Brooklyn

Shooup

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I first bumped into Tony Sandeberg, the Managing Director of ShooUp, at the 2014 TdU Village. Tony had some prototype rear lights he was trying to get off the ground. We got a prototype over into the Wednesday Legs test labs a few months later but we had a few issues and ended up sending it back sans review.

I touched base with Tony a few weeks back to see where he was at, whether he had decided it was all too hard, or whether he had persevered.

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I was pleased to hear back from Tony saying that he had persevered, and was a finalist in the Cycling Promotion Fund, a national event. That followed up from being shortlisted in ”The Australian Innovative Challenge in Oct 2012.

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From the Shooup website:

Shooup Liverider was invented in 2012 by adventurer and cyclist Tony Sandeberg. After continually hearing on the media “ another cyclists killed on our roads “ and one too many close calls, Tony had enough and decided to develop a product that would literally redirect cars safely away from the cyclist. That passion and determination underpinned the product development process that has resulted in the most innovative and effective rear safety bike light available today.

ShooUp Liverider is a new rear safety bike light designed to help save cyclists’ lives. The aerodynamic wing shape of 21 high visibility strobing red LED’s from the rear and 8 white LED’s facing oncoming traffic extends 265mm redirecting drivers safely away from the rider, providing added cycling confidence.

Main body is secured by a dynamic flex-back mechanism protecting it from knocks and impacts

Liverider quickly detaches from seat post mount for security and mini USB charging.

Tony will be heading over to Kickstarter soon to raise funds for the next stage. Watch this space.

Further details at the Shooup site here.   http://www.shooup.com.au/ 

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Red Hook Crit Brooklyn 10

This is  a format that is going from strength to strength, with stages held in London, Milan, Barcelona and the original, Brooklyn, down at the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, NY

It is the self proclaimed, and almost certainly correct, World’s Premier Track Bike Criterium.  The Red Hook Crit series are held on a short technical circuit, with the heats during daytime and the finals at night.

Crit racing lends itself to be spectator friendly, with short lap times, allowing the spectators to get close to the action, follow the movements and show their support.

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Athletes from around the world compete in the four-city series to claim the coveted championship title.

In Brooklyn a 5K running race is held on the same night and in the same spirit as the bike race.

The 5K is open to runners of all ability levels and has acquired a cult following as one of the fastest races on the east coast. Runners complete multiple laps on a USATF-certified course; cash prizes are awarded to the top finishers and first lap prime winners.

This years Brooklyn event (Brooklyn 10) took place over this last weekend, with German Stefan Schafer taking the honors in the Mens and American Colleen Gulick taking the women’s.

1 Stefan Schafer Specialized / Rocket Espresso ger
2 Colin Strickland Intelligentsia Racing usa
3 Aldo Ino Ilesic Specialized / Rocket Espresso slo
4 Davide Vigano Team Cinelli Chrome ita
5 David Van Eerd 8Bar Team ned
6 Addison Zawada State Bicycle Co. usa
7 Tristan Uhl Aventon Factory Team usa
8 Evan Murphy MASH SF usa
9 Martino Poccianti Cykeln Divisione Corse ita
10 Daniele Callegarin IRD Carrera Squadra Corse ita
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Davide Vignano 4th in his debut for Team Cinelli.

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Dangerous business this racing, as Cesar Valenzuela found out as he crashed and broke his collarbone  while leading the peloton with 5 laps to go.

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Colleen Gulick on her way to winning the Red Hook Criterium Brooklyn No.10

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Stefan Schäfer wins Brooklyn No.10

1 Colleen Gulick Deluxe Cycles
2 Eleonore Saraiva Aventon Factory Team
3 Carla Nafria Team Crit Life
4 Raphaele Lemieux Team iBike
5 Ash Duban Affinity Cycles
6 Jasmine Dotti IRD Carrera Squadra Corse
7 Sammi Runnels Aventon Factory Team
8 Tanja Erath Fixedpott
9 Tamika Hingst Canyon Rad Pack
10 Johanne Jahnke ELF Huez*

There were some pretty decent looking bikes on display at the RHCB10.

The colorful Allez Sprint track bike for the Specialized / Rocket Espresso Team.

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Colin Stricklands Pinarello
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8bar team rider David van Eerd
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Aventon

Wouldn’t it be cool to have something like this down at Adelaide’s Port Docklands Red Hook Crit Adelaide 

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Can you imagine the streets lined with thousands of spectators on a summers evening, floodlights lighting up the spectacular historic buildings music and race commentary blaring out of loudspeakers bouncing off the walls in the confined spaces. It would be phenomenal.

Who’s in?

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Cycling trip to Europe

As you would have picked up from my last posting, I  have signed up for my first overseas cycling tour with a local Adelaide company Unique Cycling Tours.

I’m doing the Provence and Allemont trip in June. At the end of the tour, I’m catching a train over to Annecy for a 5 day layover at a friends “holiday” house before heading back to Adelaide.

One of the classic ascents will be Mont Ventoux  (Windy Mount),  I’m not sure if I’ll tackle 1, 2 or 3 ascents in the one day, but the option is there.

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Some insights into Ventoux that you may not be aware of:

  • Ventoux has its own Club

Le Club des Cinglés du Mont Ventoux (Club of the Mads of the Windy Mount), is a club for riders that have climbed the col from all three routes in one day. If you can ride Bédoin, Malaucène et Sault in one day you can become a member of the club of the mad men (and women) of Mont Ventoux. Further details on the club here:  http://www.clubcinglesventoux.org/en/

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  • Ventoux has many Names

Mont Ventoux is geographically part of the Alps but stands alone from them. It is located in Provence, France, and it is easily the highest peak in the region.  The col has often been referred to as “The Beast of Provence” and “The Giant of Provence”.

  • The Bédoin Route is the Hardest

The Bédoin to the summit route is considered the hardest. It features an intense gradient-heavy section where gradients hit the 12% mark. You are also cycling the longest distance as your starting position is lower than the other two routes.

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  • The Barren Summit

The last 6 kms of Ventoux has been described as cycling on the moon. The barren land does give you a lunar landscape feel. The rock, however, is actually limestone. It has formed by the endless storms and freezing temperatures Ventoux experiences in the colder months. The road to the summit is closed for around six months of the year.

  • The Red and White Building at the Top

Resembling a lighthouse, the distinctive red and white building at the top is as a meteorological station. It was built in 1968. The building now is used to broadcast television signals as well as its original purpose.

  • High Wind Speeds

Ventoux’s microclimate keeps you on your toes. Yes you may have started the ride in brilliant sunshine, but when you hit the last 6 kms you could be riding in a thunderstorm. As you can imagine at high altitude with no cover wind speeds are high. So far, the highest recorded wind speed is 321 kph (200 mph).

  • Philosopher Quotes

Ventoux has inspired generations of cyclists and one happened to be a philosopher. Roland Barthes, arguably best known for his work on the intellectual movements of Structuralism and Post – Structuralism, was also a cycling fan.

Ventoux made such an impression on him, that he wrote two quotes that if you have ridden Ventoux you will probably be able to relate to. They are:

“The Ventoux is a god of Evil, to which sacrifices must be made. It never forgives weakness and extracts an unfair tribute of suffering.”

And,

“Physically, the Ventoux is dreadful. Bald, it’s the spirit of Dry: Its climate (it is much more an essence of climate than a geographic place) makes it a damned terrain, a testing place for heroes, something like a higher hell.”

There are not many cols that can inspire philosophers.

To join the club, there are a few rules to follow:

The Club des Cinglés du Mont-Ventoux is a closed club. It is open to people who respect the following rules:

  • Ascent by bicycle of the Mont-Ventoux from three main asphalted roads (Bédoin, Malaucène et Sault) at least;
  • the climb will be in the same day (between 0 and 24 hours) , in the sequence and the date you prefer.

OPTIONS
You can choose between 3 options:

  • Cinglé (137 km and 4400 m)
    – Up and down, by bicycle, in the same day (between 0 and 24 hours) from three main asphalted roads.
    Sequence of ride as you prefer.
  • Galérien (183 km and 6020 m)
    – Up and down, by bicycle, in the same day (between 0 and 24 hours) from three main asphalted roads.
    –Up from the Forest road by MTB if possible and down from one of three main asphalted roads.
    Sequence of ride as you prefer.
  • Bicinglette (274 km and 8800 m)
    – Twice up and down, by bicycle, in the same day (between 0 and 24 hours) from three main asphalted roads.
    Sequence of ride as you prefer.

To register, fill the form and make payment.
Entries will be received throughout the year, at least 15 days before the attempt (21 days during holiday periods). You will receive a bicycle plate and a ride card;

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Rad Race – Stop Racism, Start Race-ism

Furious Fixies against Racism

Under the motto “Stop Racism – Start Race-ism” thigh muscles burn at the RAD RACE Last (Wo)Man Standing. Without gearshifts and brakes, riders compete in a relentless round robin knock out race. Tight bends and top speeds are a radical combination.

The 2017 Rad Race Series is a championship series for fixed gear bikes only. There are team and individual track bike categories. The following races are part of the RAD RACE SERIES 2017:

  • RADRACE LMS, Berlin, 04.03.2017 RADRACE (Done)
  • FIXED42, Berlin, 18.06.2017 RADRACE (Dusted)
  • BATTLE, Hamburg, 19.08.2017
  • RADRACE CRIT, Ostend, 02 & 03.09.2017

Leggo bikes shot by Arturs Pavlovs  in MonsterparksRAD+RACE+Last+Man+Standing+Berlin+2017 (2)RAD+RACE+Last+Man+Standing+Berlin+2017RAD+RACE+Last+Man+Standing+Berlin+2017RAD+RACE+Last+Man+Standing+Last+Woman+Standing+BerlinRAD-RACE-Last-Man-Standing-Berlin-March-19-2016-Shot-by-Bengt-Stiller-1-Kopie-1024x683-650x325

There are a number of formats across the rad race series, including the Last Man Standing, which kicked off Europe’s fixed gear crit season during Berlin’s bike week earlier this year.

Based on elimination, each heat is made up of small groups, just about eight riders. Every lap the last one gets kicked out. The Berlin LMS was at an indoor Go-Kart track complete with foam mats for safety.

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Sophie Cape – AIS Experiments

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I was watching a recording from Auntie a few weeks ago, Australian Story, and came across a real belter. Sophie Cape. Does that name ring a bell?

Thought not.

Sophie Cape is a former professional athlete who retired from competitive sport ahead of the 2008 Beijing Olympics due to injury.

Sophie Cape is an award-winning artist based in Melbourne.

She grew up resisting the pull to follow her mother and grandmother, who themselves were successful artists, into the world of art. Her passion lay in downhill ski racer, a result of her father taking the family skiing in the Australian Ski Fields in her childhood.

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Sophie Cape dreamed of the Olympic Games as a downhill ski racer. Traveled to the Canadian ski fields to learn her trade.  She was building up a good career, but suffered a number of major crashes,  one in particular on Super G training.

“My leg snapped off at the top of my ski boot and it was just flapping around as I was cartwheeling down the hill with my, the boot and ski still attached and so it was just sort of my leg ended below the knee and then the sort of the suit and then there was, by the time I stopped, it was just my foot and everything was over there somewhere.”

She almost log her leg. It took  her 12 months to recover from that and get back skiing, something she was told that she would never be able to do again.

Later, as she was competing in the World University Games in Slovakia, she crashed out in a big way, her knees obliterated.

So that was that, until she was approached  by the Australian Institute of Sport who were trying to fill a gap in female track sprint cycling following the Sydney 2000 Olympics, and went looking for girls all over the country.  The program the AIS set up was effectively to develop competition for the then-rising track cycling star, Anna Meares, ahead of the Athens and Beijing Olympic Games.

Sophie was one of the 450 people that tried out, one of 20 to be selected.

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They gave  them a few weeks to train and then put them straight into the nationals. They we went straight into the velodrome, straight into the gym, straight into the sprints. It was all about power and speed right from the start, so it was no surprise that they started getting injured and over-trained and falling apart or just giving up then as a track cyclist.

Sophie started getting really serious leg pain and they couldn’t figure out its cause. Sophie underwent two very invasive surgeries, designed to try to help her.

The first was on her quads, where they cut the fascia off her quad muscles., effectively stripping the sheath off the outside of the muscles like the skin on the outside of a sausage, to allow them to grow, without restraint. It was pretty amazing when I went back training with these huge Frankenstein scars all the way down my quads.  As soon as she started training they just “went whoop!”.

Her resultant times were fast,  everything was great but then the pain came back again and it was much worse. So they tried the vascular surgery where they cut my stomach open on both sides and took veins out of my shins and put patch grafts into my arteries to make them larger. So she had these oversized arteries going into  oversized muscles.

Unfortunately for Sophie those surgeries didn’t improve or make a large difference.
They  tried everything, but they just came to the conclusion that it was severe over-training and didn’t know what the solution was. So that was the end of all sport for me for the rest of my life.

So, a an elite athlete having all that she was about being ripped asunder, her world came crashing down all at the one time. She fell into a  black hole for about a year, could barely leave the house. She was lost, suicidal. Everything she’d been working towards and training for and dreaming of, was now absolutely, truly impossible.  She didn’t really know what to do, or who she was was anymore. Nothing really made any sense anymore.

She tried a lot of things, but nothing replaced the challenge of training at the elite level. It was fate that she ended up at Art School.

Sophie Cape has since conquered her physical and psychological trauma, transforming herself into one of Australia’s most celebrated young artists.

She draws on her catastrophic sporting injuries for inspiration in her artworks, creating work on a grand scale, often in natural environments, and using materials she finds outdoors such as animal bones and soil, as well as painting with her own blood.

This disturbed me on a few levels, but I’m also a little confused. The basis for the surgery was to attempt to overcome a particularly painful muscular injury, and one can argue that modern athletic surgery is really no different, however the bulging muscles and the patching of arteries with veins to increase the blood supply to the muscles seems to me a step over the wrong side of the line.

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Rider of the Week – Russell Schrale

Race day!

Russell Schrale is a late thirties Adelaide resident who along with being bike obsessed, works for Cancer Council SA.

  • You have an association with Gravelaide, for the uninitiated, what is Gravelaide?

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Gravelaide is a series of events that is designed to pull together the gravel riding community here in SA. The events will likely evolve over time but we’re committed to three key principles of showing some great new gravel roads in the state, providing a challenge to riders and most importantly having fun and not taking ourselves seriously. We don’t put on races and we want riders who are looking to have a good time come along.

  • You are one of a team behind Gravelaide, who are the others?

Graeme Theissen (aka The Sticky Bidon) and Peter Gratwick are the other guys involved.

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  • How did Gravelaide come about?

Peter simply posted up on facebook that he was looking to get a ride organised and asked if anyone else was interested. Graeme and I responded and a week later, the three of us were eating burgers and drinking a few beers in a pub drawing loop ride ideas on the back of bar coasters. We then spent a lot of time riding many roads, coming across many dead end paths and talking with locals about how awesome it would be if they let us ride through their properties!

We’ve brought a good mix of skills to the events. I’m a spreadsheet dork who likes running the numbers and the ticketing, Peter is an ideas man who brings great enthusiasm and business development and Graeme is obsessed with finding routes that will give riders a day out to remember.

  • You’ve just hosted G2, what has been the turnout for these rides.

For our first ride in October, we were hoping to get just 45 riders along and we ended up getting 87 which was great. For this last ride in March, we were aiming for 125 and ended up with 127 and sold out a week ahead of time (having to say sorry to those that wanted to sign up late). Obviously this is a great level of growth but we need to decided where to take it now. Do we go big and start trying to entice over interstate riders or do we keep it boutique and more manageable. We’ve scheduled a BBQ at my place for a few weeks time where these discussions are to be had!

  • Whilst I wasn’t at the second, I was at the first, and I was stunned at where you took us, public roads, private properties, over fences, down ravines the mars explorer couldn’t get down. How long did it take for the route to come together?

Glad you liked it 😉

For the first one, we probably went out there about 15-20 times to ride the course and see how we could make it link together. Both long course options have been 95%+ of gravel which is unheard of for events like this that are so close to a capital city. This is not done easily though and you spend many a Friday or Saturday night staring at a computer looking at Google maps trying to follow yellow paths of gravel. Then theses’ manually creating a route for your Garmin and then out on your bike the next day to see if it works. There have been times where we’ve found something that’s perfect and then when you knock on doors to seek permission you get a no from the landowner and you have to change 30% of the course again in order to avoid long stretches of paved roads. It takes time but we think it yields great results.

  • Have there been barriers to get these up and running?

There’s nothing really stopping anyone from getting started in putting an event on, you just need to do your homework and be prepared to put some cash on the line. Apart from that it’s just how much time you’re willing to put in. We’re all working and have families so really it comes down to watching the TV in the evening or typing away on the laptop and catching up for a meal after work to run through the to do list. Although it takes time, it is fun. I did not know Peter and Graeme before but now I’d consider them to be good mates and I always look forward to catching up with them.

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  • How frequently are you planning to run.

It’s a bit unknown at this stage. We’re looking to mix it up a little and perhaps the next one might be a bit more of a ride rather than an event. Peter in particular is a keen bikepacker so perhaps we’ll look at an adventure that incorporates this as well.

  • What have you taken away from Gravelaide personally?

I’ve always worked for an organisation and have had a boss. It’s been a real treat to be able to work with two guys and create something together, it’s allowed me to scratch my entrepreneurial itch without having to quite my day job! Apart from this, I’ve met some great people and we all get a kick from seeing people post online saying they have had a great day out. We all talk about the week long glow we feel after each event. There’s nothing like putting a smile on people’s faces.

  • To run these events you need a lot of support, what backing have you received to date?

Honestly, it’s just the three of us doing this without much support. This being said, we have had support from some sponsors but really, we only seek sponsors that can keep the costs of the event low. We’re not out to make a profit but we do want to keep the ticket prices as low as possible so this help from people like Swell Beer and Balfours has really helped.

There’s no doubt thought that the best support we get is from our wives. They put up with the days out of the house, the constant facebook messaging we do back and forth and the constant talking we do about it!

So, lets hear a little about you.

  • How long have you been cycling?

Since I was around 3 years old, must be something to do with having Dutch parents!

  • What got you started in cycling?

I must have been off my bike for at least ten years during my late teens and 20’s. I started to commute again about 7 years ago and then started looking at CX bikes. I made a deal with myself that I’d drop the cash on one if only I raced it. This lead to my dropping about 10kgs and having lots of fun racing with the great people at the Port Adelaide Cycling Club events.

  • How many bikes do you own and what is your main go to bike?

I’ve got a very reasonable four bikes at the moment. An awesome Dutch commuter, a old banger mountain bike, a Bakefits Cargo bike and my jack of all trades Kona Jake the Snake CX bike. The Kona is definitely my go to given the many uses, especially as I have one wheel set with CX tyres and one with road tyres for a quick changeover.

  • What bike do you covet?

I’m actually pretty happy as is at the moment but a Salsa Woodsmoke would be pretty sweet. I’d set it up as a permanent bikepacking bike and it would also be great for weekends up at Melrose.

  • Do you do all your own maintenance or do you use a LBS? If so, which one?

I love hanging out in the shed and working on my bike… but I leave big jobs to the experts and I have to admit I’ve had them fix a few mistakes that I’ve made when I’ve overestimated by repair abilities 😉

Bike Garage

  • What cycling specific tools do you have in your “bike shed”?

A good quality stand and set of allen keys would be the most frequently used. Also, my Park Tool Dummy Hub has been fantastic but I do pick up tools as I need them. By the time I hit 60 I should have a pretty comprehensive kit!

  • What is your favourite piece of cycling kit or accessory?

My new Gravelaide cap that we got made for the last event. It gives me a kick every time that I put it on and I’ve met a couple of people out on rides that I’ve got chatting to about the event which is awesome as well.

  • What are your pet love and hates about cycling?

I love the comradery around the cycling world, you can always strike up a conversation with another rider as there is a shared sense of passion. I would not say hate but I dislike the perception that you need to spend big to get into cycling and the best kit is essential. Just get out there and have fun on whatever you have available to you.

  • Other than yourself, who is your favourite cyclist?

At the moment, Matthew Van De Poel would be my favourite. He’s a beast and when he is fit he’s unstoppable.

Mathieu van der Poel in front of Wout Van Aert
Mathieu van der Poel in front of Wout Van Aert
  • If you could have dinner with 3 people in the cycling world, who would they be and why?

Matthew Van De Poel, Jessie Carlson and Sarah Hammond. I was bitten by the IPRW bug and despite the Mike Hall tragedy, the event is a great demonstration of what humans can put themselves through.

  • Where would you take them to eat?

Knowing the IPWR diet, anywhere that’s not a roadhouse would be fine.

  • What are your craziest/fondest cycling memories?

Riding a bike through Amsterdam would be the number one. Such a fantastic city and it’s a bike utopia. I wish we could fly all the residents of Adelaide there over to ride bikes for a week. We’d radically change the way we think about transport as a result.

  • Have you had any nasty crashes? If so how did the worst occur and what was the consequence?

Yep. I crashed during a CX race over in Melbourne. To cut a long story short, I snapped my arm and partially dislocated my shoulder. The end result was a bone graft and rehab that is still going.

  • What is your favourite post ride cafe, and what would you normally buy as a treat?

I don’t really have one. I tend to leave it all out on the road and my recovery is a cold beer whilst having a shower!

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  • Do you have a favourite overseas country in mind you’d love to take your bike to?

Riding from the North to the South of NZ is very high up my list at the moment.

  • What is your favourite local training route?

I like hammering my bike around the parklands making up CX courses as I go or alternatively, the up Mount Osmond, Lofty and down Norton is a go to.

  • What is the biggest cycling lie you have told a partner?

There have been many but they all start with “I’ve been doing some research and I really need a …….”

  • What cycling related thing would you like for your next birthday?

More free time to get out an ride!

  • Is there a local cycling outfit/company/cycling club/cycling group/person that you would like to plug?

The Port Adelaide Cycling Club have done fantastic things for the CX scene in Adelaide. This has been a big feeder for the Gravel scene and there have been many many hours that they have put in. After organising a couple of events I’m more aware of just how much work it takes and we should all be grateful for clubs and individuals that give us an opportunity to do organised rides/races.

A not uncommon sight in my cyclocross 'career'

  • From a non-cycling perspective, what do you love about Adelaide?

It’s just awesome. Sure we have our challenges but the quality of life is just so high that it’s hard to beat. To hard to name just one thing!

  • What is your go to place when interstaters come to Adelaide?

I’m a big fan of the small bar scene and what it has done for the night life in Adelaide. Peel/Leigh Streets are always on the agenda as a result.

  • Is there anything else you feel like talking about?

Nope! Thanks for the opportunity and for doing what you do to promote cycling in this great state,

Thanks Russell, keep up the great work with Gravelaide.

Gravelaide route planning _ photo credit to thestickybidon

Hope you enjoyed this weeks posting

till next time

tight spokes

iPib

Film Night

Handmade Bikes – SAGE

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Hows this for a sweet titanium bike – Say hello to the Belgium Beast.

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Inspired by the Northern Classics such as the Tour of Flanders and Paris-Roubaix, this custom painted stock frame by ColorWorks comes fully loaded with a Shimano Dura-Ace 9100 drivetrain, Chris King Precision Components headset & bottom bracket, and ENVE Composites wheels & cockpit.

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This bike will be at the SAGE Sea Otter Classic booth from April 20 – 23.

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If you love Ti Porn, have a look at some of the USA made SAGE Ti bikes here.

https://sagetitanium.com/

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Barossa Gravel

I was fortunate to spend a few nights at the Barossa Valley over the Easter weekend, celebrating my 22nd anniversary, (didn’t take the bike – I wouldn’t have reached my 23rd).

As an avid road cyclist, I know there aren’t too many roads bitumised roads around the Valley, but what that does mean is that there are plenty of Gravel.

Driving back to our hotel room after a pleasant day in the Valley I did what i love doing and that’s heading up a promising road that I had no idea where it goes. Promising in that it was heading up.

I must say, this road surpassed my  expectations.  Apart from the fact it was a no through road, the climb, with a few downhill sections, is around 3.8 km long with a vertical gain of around 240m.  Gravel not too loose, but the views across the Valley from various vantage spots going up was superb.

Have a gander below.

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IPWR Film Night

The official Rapha IPWR documentary has been released, and you can rent online, e and watch it at home all by yourself, or you can band together and join in a fundraising night on Friday the 28th April, at Five Little Figs, Payneham South.

The idea behind this event is to unite as cyclists and show our support for the event and the ultra endurance legend, Mike Hall who sadly lost his life during this race. A small donation on the night will go directly to Mikes fundraiser page to help his family.

There will be deer and stuff, possibly pizza and prizes, but keep an eye on the Facebook site here for more details.

They are limited to numbers due to venue size so to confirm your spot hit ‘attend’ on the event page so they have a rough idea of numbers.

IPWR Movie Night Fundraiser

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Charity Ride – Wade Burns – National Breast Cancer Foundation

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This Friday, Wade Burns, a previous Wednesday Legs Rider of the Week heads off on a little challenge, riding from Adelaide to Port Macquarie (along the coast via Melbourne and Sydney), over 2,600 kms and climb over 22,000m over 15 days, to get to the start line of IRONMAN Australia; and then competing in the event consisting of consecutive 3.8km swim, 180km bike and 42.2km run.

Wade is raising money for the National Breast Cancer Foundation to fight breast cancer. His mother in law was diagnosed last year and has undergone chemo, radio and other treatments.

This one’s for her and all other women and families battling breast cancer.

The link below is to Wades fundraising page; any donations or sharing would be greatly appreciated. They’ve raised $7,500 thus far and Macquarie Foundation are looking like matching it dollar for dollar up to $25k – their goal is to raise $25k and turn it into $50k.

Please help Wade by donating to this worthy charity .

https://the-ride.everydayhero.com/au/wade

 

https://wednesdaylegs.com/featured-riders/wade-burns/

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Rider of the Week – Andrew Wilson

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  • What is your daytime job?

I work in infrastructure asset management with SA Water.

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  • How long have you been cycling and what got you started?

Since I was a kid, I was always jealous of mate’s expensive road bikes at school as they trained for the pedal prix. My 10 speed Standish didn’t really cut it. However, I bought a second hand road bike in 2006 to commute. I laughed when a guy at the place I bought my shoes and helmet from told me that I’d start taking the long way home. Seriously, who needs to ride more than 23km one-way. Things changes and I not only found the long way home, but picked the one with the most hills.

  • How many bikes do you own and what is your main go to bike?

3, and a half

A roadie, mtb, and a single speed – The roadie is my go to bike. A giant propel – awesome for crit racing and flats – not so great for hills.

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  • What bike do you covet?

The half mentioned previously is a slightly cracked Fuji Altaimira 1.0 frame. It is my long-term plan to rebuild it so it is a sub 7kg bike for better climbing (so I can avoid the need to lose the gut). Something lighter than the Propel and becomes the general training bike. N+1. Young twins and a seven year old suggest it’s a pipe dream.

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  • You dabble in racing, where do you race and how would you describe yourself?

I race with Norwood cycling club. I’m a genuine d-grader, but who knows one day I may make the lofty heights of C – grade.

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  • Do you do all your own maintenance or do you use a LBS? If so, which one?

LOL! I try, invariably I make a lot of mistakes. The boys at Super Elliots look after me well, and try not to laugh too hard when I walk in with another one of my ‘fixit’ stories. Otherwise, Henry, a mate, is very handy for late night quick fixes, and to help point out my mistakes.

  • What cycling specific tools do you have in your “bike shed”?

I bought a pack of Chinese ‘park’ tool rip-offs. It has about 40 pieces and I’ve added bits and pieces along the way. I have a bike stand that helps make it look like I know what I am doing.

  • What are your pet love and hates about cycling?

I love the way even though everyone is competing flat out, whether it be racing, chasing a segment time, or just getting to the next stobie pole first, that they would all stop to help you out with a puncture or crash. I know he is not that well thought of on this blog, but durianrider took a punch for me when I was car-doored on rundle street a few years back. He did not know me from a bar of soap, but he stood up for me because he could see the guy was a nut case.

Hates. I am crap at descending. I really wish I could switch of my brain.

  • Other than yourself, who is your favourite cyclist?

Cav, love his attitude, and will to win. Last year’s TDF was awesome to watch after so many had written him off.  (Eds note: It was announced a week back that Cav has contracted an infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein Barr Virus and has temporarily withdrawn from cycling to focus on recovery. It will be a waiting game in terms of knowing when he will be ready to resume full training)

  • If you could have dinner with 3 people in the cycling world, who would they be and why?

Cav, because of the above. Wiggo, he’s a strange bloke, that would make dinner interesting, but I wouldn’t mind getting some of the Fluimucil he used so effectively J Tony Martin or Gilbert so I could share saddle sore stories, though I’m not sure choosing to put sandpaper on your saddle counts.

  • Where would you take them to eat?

I’ll eat anything, and lots of it. It may not be the best food but I’d take them to Scuzzi on a Tuesday night so all the other riders that head there every week could share in the stories. (Scuzzi was great up until my twins were born, but hopefully I’ll get back out soon.

  • What are your craziest/fondest cycling memories?

Pro’s – Stuey O’Grady winning Paris Roubaix. But I almost had tears when Hayman won last year as well.

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Me – every TDU. A good mate of mine organises a few mates and we travel around watching the pro’s,  it’s always way more km’s than we should do, lots of laughs, and Andy knows every good spot in Adelaide for food and drink. I look forward to it every year.

  • Have you had any nasty crashes? If so how did the worst occur and what was the consequence?

A few run ins with cars, but worst crash was descending down upper start. Ego was greater than ability and I tried to keep up with a quicker group. The consequence was explain all the blood running down my leg after jumping straight in to the shower and having to descend old Belair road with buckled wheels and loosened brakes.

  • What is your favourite post ride cafe, and what would you normally buy as a treat?

My Saturday group goes to Hosko’s. (Carnevale Coffee on East Avenue) Coffee and dairy don’t seem to sit all that well with my stomach, and so unlike every other cyclist I avoid coffee. The waiter takes delight in  yelling my order out. Sadly, it’s a Large Hot chocolate with lactose free milk and extra chocolate. It’s fair to say I end up drinking coke fairly regularly to avoid the embarrassment.  (Apologies to Ian pib who has had to buy these for me occasionally as well.)

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  • Do you have a favourite overseas country in mind you’d love to take your bike to?

Don’t get me started. 11 mates (but who’s counting) are all going to France & Italy this year, and taking in some of the famous climbs. I’m as jealous as hell but it just doesn’t work with the kids. Do cycling holidays count as N+1 as well?

  • What is your favourite local training route?

The bog standard loop is Nortons, lofty down the old freeway.

  • What is the biggest cycling lie you have told a partner?

I’m still working out how to tell a lie that sees me join my mates in France. I’ll let you know if I pull it off.

  • What cycling related thing would you like for your next birthday?

Some new shoes, they are overdue.

  • Is there a local cycling outfit/company/cycling club/cycling group/person that you would like to plug?

Thanks to all the volunteers at Norwood Cycling Club for doing an awesome job organising the races and putting up with us riders. It’s a thankless task but much appreciated.

Thank’s to Super Elliotts for fixing my stuff ups at a moment’s notice,

And lastly thanks to all the guys and girls I’ve ridden with and Bastardi Grassi, Scuzzi, and more recently RHOFO. RHOFO management is always looking for new members so if there are any other nutcases that like getting out at 5:30am on a Saturday feel free to point them in my direction.

  • From a non-cycling perspective, what do you love about Adelaide?

It’s a big country town.

  • What is your go to place when interstaters come to Adelaide?

Any loop that takes them along woods hill road between Ashton and Greenhill Road, and my favourite, Aldgate Valley Road.

  • Is there anything else you feel like talking about?

Keep up the good work with the blog.

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Faces of Paris Roubaix

Paris-Roubaix: Recent winners
2016: Mathew Hayman (Aus) Orica-GreenEdge
2015: John Degenkolb (Ger) Giant-Alpecin
2014: Niki Terpstra (Ned) Etixx-QuickStep
2013: Fabian Cancellara (Swi) RadioShack
2012: Tom Boonen (Bel) Omega Pharma-QuickStep
2011: Johan Vansummeren (Bel) Garmin-Cervelo
2010: Fabian Cancellara (Swi) Saxo Bank
2009: Tom Boonen (Bel) QuickStep
2008: Tom Boonen (Bel) QuickStep
2007: Stuart O’Grady (Aus) Team CSC

 

And this year – Greg van Avermaet

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This race would have to be one of the races most looked forward too across the cycling community. It’s an honest and brutal race where there are no places to hide. There seems to be two tactics uses throughout the race.

  1. Be the first into the cobbles
  2. If you happen to be in the leading bunch, work with your competitors to build up a big enough lead so sou can then play cat and mouse onto and in the velodrome.

That seems to be about it.  Everything else that happens seems to depend on an ability to push through the pain and ride your luck.

Unlike just about every other race, if you have a mechanical, you can pretty much kiss your chances goodbye. There will probably be no teammates around to help you, and if they are, or you happen to have a flat or break a wheel coincidentally where the guys are standing on the side of the road holding wheels above their heads, the small gap is pretty difficult to close.  Not impossible, as proven by Greg van Avermaet (do doooo de doo do) who had a flat, had to wait for a replacement wheel, and then was able to work his way back up to the front. A massive effort.

And finally, who doesn’t love a good head shot from the end of Paris Roubaix.

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Oh, and congrats to the evergreen Phillipe Gilbert for his win at the Amstel Gold. Unfortunately he was carted off to hospital for some kidney problems afterwards that has stopped him for a while now.

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till next time

tight spokes

iPib

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The Long Road

Vale Mike Hall

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That Sugar Film

I watched a film on SBS Sunday night that was quite disturbing, and a revelation at the same time.  Now I would consider myself a fairly intelligent bloke (some would disagree), and I don’t often get caught up in fads, the latest diet and conspiracy theories, however this film had me paying a little more attention to that fiendish white granular carbohydrate.

Sugar.

Now I like my sweet foods, and nothing is going to stop me from eating them, however  I do know that like pretty much everything in life, except cycling of course, moderation is the key. But, the amount of hidden sugars in the everyday foods we eat, and the cost to our health by over indulging is a level of absurdity I hadn’t paid too much attention to. If you didn’t catch it, try finding it on SBS On Demand.  it will be well worth your while.

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That Sugar Film is a 2014 Australian documentary starring and directed by Damon Gameau.

The film follows Gameau’s experiment on himself, changing from a low sugar diet to a high sugar diet for 60 days. His strategy was to only eat foods that were marketed as a healthy option such as low fat foods, juices and the like, what we would find in the processed foods section in your standard supermarket.

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His target was to eat the equivalent to forty teaspoons of sugar per day, a standard amount in an Australians diet.

We watched him as he as he gained weight, grew lethargic, and developed fatty liver disease, all at the same time as he was maintaining as much as possible his standard healthy life.

By the end of the experiment he had put on 8.5 kilograms, developed pre type 2 diabetes and heart disease risks, had an extra 10 centimetres of the dangerous visceral fat around his stomach and noticed an impact on his moods and cognitive functions.

So it’s the weight and fat bit that got me thinking about adding it to this weeks posting. Weight is one of the biggest issues with cyclists.  It’s there in our face every time we jump into the interweb looking to buy new components.

“The world’s lightest 10-speed chain now offers you more advantages than ever: besides the great shifting performance, it’s super light weight and smooth running”

So I see the “rationing” of sugar in my diet as being one of my biggest opportunities, aside from just riding that is, to improve, by keeping the weight down.

It’s scary how much hidden sugar there is on the everyday foods.  I know it’s there, but we’re so used to the taste and it just being there that we have just gotten used to it. It’s hard work escaping it. Have a look at that BBQ sauce, hoisin sauce and sweet chilli sauce. They all have more sugar in them per serve than chocolate sauce. Wow

I love the South Australian Paris Creek yoghurt, the fruitless muesli and a banana for breakfast, but having a quick look at the sugar in these foods I found out that my standard breakfast had around 16 grams (4 teaspoons) of hidden sugar. Now, that may not change my breakfast habits at this stage, but at least I know now, and that knowledge will at least inform my eating choices for the remainder of the day,

Oh, as a by the way, The World Health Organisation wants us to limit our sugar intake to six teaspoons (25 grams) a day. Youch.

Processed food, be very very wary of it.

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WednesdayLeg Changes

You may have noticed a change or two with this blog.

First up, this is the soft unveiling of the new Wednesday Legs.

Thanks to Nat over at Spin Cycle Clothing for developing the logo for me.

And thanks for Mary, my favourite Interior Designer, for helping me out with the cpolour schemes.

The pale blue sky, the lush green grass, and red for the setting sun.

The chevron represents the Adelaide Hills, a place that I hold close to my heart.

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We’ll see where this all goes, but I’m keen to get a Wednesday Legs kit designed around this logo and colour scheme.

And secondly, the blog look. Im playing around with a few options, so you may see a few changes over the coming months.

The header image will change, I;m nit entirely happy with it, but I need to mull it over for a while.

Tour of Flanders

34-year-old Philippe Gilbert (Quick-Step) attacked with more than 50km from the finish line and held off a chasing field to claim his biggest win since the 2012 world championships.

On Sunday, everything went right for Phil, who was raised in a village at the base of the La Redoute, the famous climb of Liège-Bastogne-Liège, won the biggest race in Flanders.

His legs held out, he didn’t bonk, and didn’t cramp up. No one could bridge out, and he didn’t crash, didn’t puncture, and didn’t panic. Looking back with 1km to go, he had more than enough time to celebrate. At the finish line, the former world champion had enough time to get off his bike, and carry it across the line, held triumphantly in the air.

 

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This bookie had Gilbert as the favourite

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Sagan was up there with the favourites, and was riding strong, until he brushed a black jacket hanging innocently over the railings, his front wheel turned in and he lost balance. Ouch

“I was close to the barriers. I was in control when I was close to the barriers, but I think we caught a jacket or something, because if I’d hit the barrier, I would have been on the ground straight away, and the bike would have stayed there,” Sagan said after the race.

No time for spooning!

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Tour of Flanders Women

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Rivera outkicked two-time Australian road race champion Gracie Elvin (Orica-Scott) and last year’s Gent-Wevelgem winner Chantal Blaak (Boels-Dolmans) in a select bunch sprint in the 153.3km cobbled classic – the longest race of the WWT this season .

Congratulations Rivera for her win and being the first American to win the Womens Flanders.

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Congratulation to Gracie Elvin from Orica Scott Women for being the first Australian woman to podium at the Womens Flanders.

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Placings.

1 Coryn Rivera (USA) Team Sunweb Women
2 Gracie Elvin (Aus) Orica Scott Women
3 Chantal Blaak (Ned) Boels Dolmans Cyclingteam
4 Annemiek Van Vleuten (Ned) Orica Scott Women
5 Lotte Kopecky (Bel) Lotto Soudal Ladies

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ORBEA TERRA

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Orbea have released a new adventure bike, using the Spanish brand’s range of road & endurance bikes for design inspiration, to come up with TERRA, a longer wheelbased bike with a more relaxed geometry, alongside a revised fork and carbon lay-up process, to lend more comfort and compliance in key areas where it’s needed.

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Terra is for riders who do enough riding off-tarmac to need something tougher than a traditional road or endurance bike. It looks like a fun bike that can fill several roles – Gravel, Road, CX, Winter Training or Commuting.

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Prices for a complete TERRA start at $2,999US, all the way up the range topping Shimano Ultegra/FSA equipped M20iD.

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Rider of the Week – Anthony Mezzini

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I’ve not met Anthony, have been meaning to get around to his workshop in Hyde Park, but time has run away from me. I have however heard many good things about Anthony’s services over the years, so I decided to touch base with Anthony about a feature.  Fortunately he accepted.

This is Anthony’s story.

I was born into a non-traditional Italian family and grew up in the Western Suburbs of Adelaide. At the age of 23 I traveled overseas and eventually settled in Sydney. It was here that I went to university to study a MBA and Masters of Finance, meet a girl and got married. I worked in number of marketing roles in the healthcare industry, however my passion was always in cycling and the biomechanics behind it. My wife and I decided to move back to Adelaide about 5 years ago and that’s when I started Elbows Akimbo. I am currently studying human movement at UNISA and enjoying the challenges associated with juggling life with 2 kids, cycling and running my business.

  • You run a business called Elbows Akimbo, what is it and where did the name come from?

Elbows Akimbo is a business focused on providing high quality, state-of-art bike servicing and fitting for cyclists of all levels.

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In terms of the origin of the name of the business, I read an article where a journalist had used the term to describe the riding style of Johan Museeuw during the Paris-Roubaix. At the time I was developing a business plan for a bike store, and it just resonated with me.

  • With your experience seeing all sorts of cyclists pass through your doors, what are some of the more common problems you see?

For bike fitting, it is usually some type of discomfort with the contact points (saddle, handlebars and shoes/pedals) as well as lower back and knee pain.

For bike servicing, creaking. People almost always think it’s the bottom bracket. All noises seems to emanate from the BB. Sometimes it is, but often it’s something else like the headset, front or rear hub, saddle etc.

  • How long have you been cycling and what got you started?

I started riding a roadie when I was in high school, probably when I was 14 or 15. I don’t know what go me started, I had a couple of friends and we were interested in cycling and it just started from there. We didn’t really have any mentors or people to encourage us, we just picked it up.

  • How many bikes do you own and what is your main go to bike?

I’ve only have three bikes. My main bike is a Pinarello Prince circa 2007.

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I also have an aluminium Trek that has been resprayed and I use that as a spare and for the trainer.

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The third bike is 24” BMX Sunday cruiser that I bought so that I could go riding with my daughters.

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  • What bike do you covet?

The Pinerallo, they really are great bikes. I think that they offer a complete package – quality, finish, performance, handling and ride quality – it’s really hard to get that combination with any other brand.

  • What tools would you recommend a cyclist have at home bike shed?

Without getting too carried away, I think you can do a lot with the following:
A full set of good quality T or P handle hex wrenches – 2 to 8mm
A full set of good quality L shaped ball hex wrenches – 2 to 8mm
A 25T and 30T torx wrench if you have torx bolts on your bike
A chain whip
A 12” shifter
The appropriate cassette locking ring toll (shimano or campy)
A 5mm and 6mm flat head and a #1 and #2 phillips head screwdriver
A pair of pointy nose pliers.

  • What are your pet love and hates about cycling?

The great thing about cycling is that just about anyone can participate and if the will is there, they can get pretty good. I think this is part of the reason why cycling has become so popular. However, one of the issues with such large participation rates and novices is that cycling etiquette and safety out on the road at times could be better.

  • Other than yourself, who is your favourite cyclist?

At the moment I’m a big fan of Richie Porte. It’s great to see an Aussie who has the talent to win a grand tour riding at the top of his game.

Tour Down Under - Stage 2

  • If you could have dinner with 3 people in the cycling world, who would they be and why?

Jan Ullrich, Marco Pantani and Miguel Indurain. They were some of the great champions of the era when I really grew to love cycling. Drug scandals aside, they were my heroes.

Ullrich of Germany adjusts his helmet before the start to the Tour de Romandie, a prologue time-trial around Genevab0679e40893d6b7b4adb98c087f451ebTOUR DE FRANCE

  • Where would you take them to eat?

I love entertaining at our house, so at home for some traditional food from the region where my family comes from Molfetta Italy.

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  • Have you had any nasty crashes? If so how did the worst occur and what was the consequence?

No, I’ve been very very lucky. I had a couple of offs when I lived in Sydney in the space of a few weeks but only lost a bit of skin.

  • What is your favourite post ride cafe, and what would you normally buy as a treat?

Unfortunately, with the business, study and family, I don’t have much time for cafes and the coffee at my house is pretty good.

  • What is your favourite local training route?

When I’m fit, probably the ride out to Lobethal via Norton Summit and back along Gorge Road. It’s not too long, offers a reasonable variety of terrain and has enough climbing to put some hurt in the legs.

  • What is the biggest cycling lie you have told a partner?

That my Pinarello Prince with Campy Record and Shamals purchased new in 2007 cost $6K

  • What cycling related thing would you like for your next birthday?

A Pinarello F10

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  • Is there a local cycling outfit/company/cycling club/cycling group/person that you would like to plug?

At the moment we sponsor a few clubs, associations and teams, most of which we’ve had a on-going relationship with over the past few years which has proven to be mutually rewarding, they include: IsoWhey Sports Swiss Wellness Cycling Team, Triathlon SA, The Lakers Triathlon Club and FRA PowerOn Cycling Club

  • From a non-cycling perspective, what do you love about Adelaide?

The ease of getting around and the ability to bring up kids around our family. The Adelaide Oval brings a great atmosphere to the city in winter for footy which I also love.

  • What is your go to place when interstaters come to Adelaide?

Adelaide Hills for lunch and Peel St for kick ons.

 

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Thanks Anthony, I pleasure to touch base, and I will pop around over the next few weeks.

till next time

tight spokes

iPib

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